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https://collectrussia.com/DISPITEMWINDOW.HTM?item=31107
Item# 31107   $195.00  Add to cart   Show All Images   Download PDF
"German Atrocities," 1914 lithograph, dated and credited at the bottom of the image to the I.
D. Sytin Cooperative lithography firm in Moscow. One of the classic "atrocity- image" posters/prints from the Eastern Front in World War One.

Medium size: measures 19 " x 14 ".

To enrage the Russian population and perhaps increase both enlistment and participation in War Bond drives, Russian print makers were not shy about showing scenes of crimes being perpetrated by the German army against innocent civilians. This Lubok shows a burning village literally being turned into a Teutonic three ring circus of horror. There are an almost dizzying number of crimes h

D. Sytin Cooperative lithography firm in Moscow. One of the classic "atrocity- image" posters/prints from the Eastern Front in World War One.

Medium size: measures 19 " x 14 ".

To enrage the Russian population and perhaps increase both enlistment and participation in War Bond drives, Russian print makers were not shy about showing scenes of crimes being perpetrated by the German army against innocent civilians. This Lubok shows a burning village literally being turned into a Teutonic three ring circus of horror. There are an almost dizzying number of crimes happening here, ranging from a baby being bayonetted to a firing squad executing civilians to a local resident being unceremoniously tossed from a balcony. Stephen M. Norris, in his excellent book about lubki, A War of Images, refers to a very similar print but the image he describes includes firing squads shooting nurses while this one lacks nurses but includes the infamous bayonetted baby image.

Generally good condition with bright colors and very minimal edge tears / crumpling. There is a tiny area of paper loss about the size of a fingernail on the bottom edge. There is also a very light fold running vertically down the print about two inches in from the right edge. At the top of the fold, there was a tears that has been addressed by the application of acid-free tape; the fold and the tear were so unobtrusive and unnoticeable from the front that we owned this print for quite a while before we even noticed them. The image area is otherwise undisturbed. Frankly, we think that it might not be necessary to contract with a paper restorer before framing this print; a competent framer could easily handle everything for you.

A War of Images, by the way, is one of the very few publications in English that deals with the whole tradition of Russian printmaking. If you collect Lubok prints and are unfamiliar with it, we recommend it highly.
$195.00  Add to cart