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Item# 29463   $1,900.00  Add to cart   Show All Images   Download PDF
Order of Alexander Nevsky, Type 3, early "Deep Dish" variation, #24258, awarded on 19 February 1945 to Guards Captain Anatoliy Belov.

Silver gilt, enamels; measures 51.0 mm in height, 49.6 mm in width; weighs 41.7 grams without screw plate. Features a distinctive concaved "deep dish" shape, mint mark in almost straight lines, and wider bands at the lower ends of the battleaxes.

In outstanding, excellent condition. The enamel has only a few tiny contact marks that are nearly unnoticeable to the naked eye; no chips, flaking or rubbing. The center medallion is absolutely pristine, free of even microscopic wear; its raised details are exceptionally crisp. Practically all of the original gilt is p

Silver gilt, enamels; measures 51.0 mm in height, 49.6 mm in width; weighs 41.7 grams without screw plate. Features a distinctive concaved "deep dish" shape, mint mark in almost straight lines, and wider bands at the lower ends of the battleaxes.

In outstanding, excellent condition. The enamel has only a few tiny contact marks that are nearly unnoticeable to the naked eye; no chips, flaking or rubbing. The center medallion is absolutely pristine, free of even microscopic wear; its raised details are exceptionally crisp. Practically all of the original gilt is present on the wreath, battle axes, quiver and sword. Beautiful untouched silver patina makes nice contrast with the gold plating. Screw post is full length, approximately 14 mm. Includes original silver screw plate. This superb and extremely attractive piece is literally impossible to upgrade!

Anatoliy Belov was born in 1921 in the city of Vologda. From 1938 he attended an artillery academy in Leningrad, graduating as a Lieutenant in July 1941, immediately after the German invasion of the Soviet Union. Belov was promoted to Senior Lieutenant almost immediately, was promoted again to Captain in March 1942, and reached the rank of Major in April 1945 - at the age of 24, and less than four years after being commissioned!

After a short stint with a reserve regiment, Belov was on the front lines from November 1941. Initially he commanded a mortar battalion with the Volkhov Front (Army Group), but in July 1942 he was transferred as a battery commander to 86th Guards Mortar Regiment of the Stalingrad Front - just as the German juggernaut was barreling down on Stalingrad.

The "Guards Mortars" was a code name for the Katyusha Multiple Rocket Launchers, aka "Stalin's Organs". This was one of several innovative Soviet weapons (some of the other famous examples are Shturmovik ground-attack airplane and T-34 tank) that proved a nasty surprise to the Germans early in the war and made a significant contribution to its eventual outcome. It's worth mentioning that Stalin was especially paranoid about ever losing the secret of Katusha rockets to the Germans, and therefore only the most trusted and battle-proven officers were appointed to command the "Guards Mortars", literally best of the best. The fact that Belov was assigned to such a unit early in the war speaks volumes about his value as a field commander.

In November 1942, Belov was transferred to command a Katuysha squadron under the Central Front. In June 1943 - May 1944 he got a break from frontline action while serving as topography instructor with a training unit in Moscow. He was back in action in June 1944 as squadron commander of the 83rd Guards Mortar Regiment and remained with this unit for the duration of the war.

During January 1945, the 83rd Guards Mortars assisted the 140th Rifle Division, 38th Army in the 4th Ukrainian Front West Carpathian offensive. Throughout this campaign, the fire of the Belov's Katuyshas provided vital support by clearing the way for the Soviet infantry. For example, on 17 January, his rocket launchers were credited with eliminating up to a platoon of enemy infantry. On the following day, Belov's squadron with a single salvo obliterated an enemy column killing as many as 30 German soldiers and destroying seven horse-drawn carriages. During 20-21 January, the squadron destroyed "up to a battalion" of enemy troops, two artillery guns, several carriages and three motor vehicles in the area of Gdow (southeast of Krakow, Poland). On 22 January, Belov boldly positioned the launchers in the open near the railway station of Skawin and with a single salvo destroyed two automatic cannon and killed 15 enemy soldiers.

In the subsequent award commendation for an Order of Alexander Nevsky, the regiment commander especially cited Belov's ability to keep pace with the infantry throughout the offensive. By 18th February, the recommendation had passed through the chain of command and received final approval of the 4th Ukrainian Front's Commander of the Artillery.

In March 19445, Belov received a combat wound that ended his frontline service. He was transferred to the reserves soon after the victory in Europe finishing the war with three orders: the Nevsky, Patriotic War 1st cl. and Red Star - as well as Medals for the Defense of Stalingrad and Victory over Germany. In 1946, he enrolled as a student at the International Relations Department of the Kiev State University and was still studying there in 1948, the last year for which records are available.

Research Materials: Xerox copy and complete English translation of the award commendation, award record card and service record (the latter includes his photo). Included is also a very well-written and detailed biography of Belov in English language compiled by the collector who previously owned the Order of Alexander Nevsky.
$1,900.00  Add to cart