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     Home > SOVIET ORDERS AND MEDALS > Highest Soviet Prizes & Honorary Titles

    http://collectrussia.com/DISPITEMWINDOW.HTM?item=32990

    Lenin Prize Medal, #1450, circa mid-1960s issue.

    Lenin Prize Medal, #1450, circa mid-1960s issue.

    The medallion is in solid 23 K gold; measures 27.1 mm in width; weighs 20.3 grams without suspension and connecting link; overall weight with suspension is 27.4 g. Beautifully detailed bas-relief of Lenin in high tri-dimensional profile to the obverse. The reverse has a stamped serial number. The suspension is in silver gilt, measures 23.9 mm wide.

    In very fine condition. The Lenin's bas-relief has only a few tiny scuffs and contact marks, mostly to the forehead, but no significant overall wear; its details are nicely preserved and crisp. The recessed field of the medallion on the obverse is mostly pristine, with just a single ding at approximately 3 o'clock position and a couple of microscopic contact marks. There are more significant dings, nicks and mild scrapes to the raised edge in the upper segment, but none of them are very detractive. The reverse has scuffs in the mid- and upper section, some of which affected the second line of the inscription. The damage to the lettering is limited to the raised parts of three of the letters and therefore not too noticeable without a magnifying glass. Besides that, the field on the reverse has a single ding at 9 o'clock; its stippling is mostly intact and beautifully defined. The raised edge of the reverse has a few minor dings only, no nicks.

    The medal comes on original suspension device, complete with back plate and fully functional pin attachment. The original gold plating on the suspension is present throughout and clearly visible, although it is partly obscured by silver patina on the reverse. The connecting link is original and has not been cut. The ribbon is old and shows wear, but it is still perfectly sound and clean.

    The Lenin Prize was established as a monetary reward in 1925 and first awarded in 1926 to several leading scientists for groundbreaking research. Later it was also issued for works of art, literature, cinematography, technological achievements etc. The title of Lenin Prize Winner or "Laureate" would bring immense recognition and career benefits for life.

    Lenin Prize was not awarded during the Stalin's years but it was reintroduced in 1956, during the "de-Stalinization" campaign. The gold medal was established during the same year. The first person to receive it was Igor Kurchatov, the father of Soviet atomic bomb. In the first years after its introduction, up to 76 prizes could be awarded annually, often shared between members of a single team that had worked on the same project. In 1967, State Prize took the role of the lesser award and the status of Lenin Prize, already an extremely prestigious award, became thereby further elevated. Henceforth, the Lenin Prize was awarded once every two years (although there were some exceptions for secret projects) and in far smaller numbers, only 30 at a time. Unlike the earlier Stalin Prize, Lenin Prize could be awarded to any person only once in a lifetime. It must be noted that although no serial number records for Lenin Prizes have been found as of now, they may exist in the


    $3,500.00  

     
       
     
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